Cover of: Disowning Slavery | Joanne Pope Melish

Disowning Slavery

Gradual Emancipation and Race in New England, 1780-1860
  • 296 Pages
  • 4.68 MB
  • 2782 Downloads
  • English
by
Cornell University Press
American history: c 1500 to c 1800, American history: c 1800 to c 1900, History of ideas, intellectual history, Slavery & emancipation, c 1700 to c 1800, c 1800 to c 1900, History, Antislavery movements, United States - General, Social Science, History - U.S., Political Freedom & Security - Civil Rights, History: American, Northeastern & North Atlantic states, United States - 19th Century, African Americans, Discrimination & Racism, 18th century, 19th century, Civil rights, New En
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7849043M
ISBN 100801484375
ISBN 139780801484377

"Disowning Slavery brims with ideas: it is an exciting and argumentative book.", Journal of American History "Painstakingly researched, filled with new information and astute analysis, this book is a major contribution to our knowledge of New England slavery and a valuable addition to the understanding of race relations in the United States."Cited by: Disowning Slavery book.

Read 5 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. After slavery was abolished in New England, white citizens seemed /5(5). "Disowning Slavery brims with ideas: it is an exciting and argumentative book." (Journal of American History) "Painstakingly researched, filled with new information and astute analysis, this book is a major contribution to our knowledge of New England slavery and a valuable addition to the understanding of race relations in the United States."4/5(9).

In the Shadow of Slavery, then, is a big and ambitious book, one in which insights about race and class in New York City abound. Leslie Harris has masterfully brought more than two centuries of African American history back to life in this illuminating new work."—David Roediger, author of The Wages of Whiteness In in lower Manhattan, a.

Book Description: Following the abolition of slavery in New England, white citizens seemed to forget that it had ever existed there.

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Drawing on a wide array of primary sources-from slaveowners' diaries to children's daybooks to racist broadsides-Joanne Pope Melish reveals not only how northern society changed but how its perceptions changed as well.

Disowning Slavery is a brilliant book." David Brion Davis "Joanne Pope Melish argues that the need to portray a virtuous North battling the slave-holding South during the Civil War resulted in the creation of a 'mythology of a free New England' in the Author: Joanne Pope Melish.

Following the abolition of slavery in New England, white citizens seemed to forget that it had ever existed there. Drawing on a wide array of primary sources—from slaveowners' diaries to children's daybooks to racist broadsides—Joanne Pope Melish. Following the abolition of slavery in New England, white citizens seemed to forget that it had ever existed there.

Drawing on a wide array of primary sources—from slaveowners' diaries to children's daybooks to racist broadsides—Joanne Pope Melish reveals not only how northern society changed but how its perceptions changed as well.

Melish explores the origins of racial thinking and. In this Book. Additional Information.

Description Disowning Slavery FB2

Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and "Race" in New England, –; by Joanne Pope Melish ; Book; Published by: Cornell University Press; View contents. View Citation; summary. Read "Disowning Slavery Gradual Emancipation and "Race" in New England, –" by Joanne Pope Melish available from Rakuten Kobo.

Following the abolition of slavery in New England, white citizens seemed to forget that it had ever existed there. Drawi. COUPON: Rent Disowning Slavery Gradual Emancipation and "Race" in New England, 1st edition () and save up to 80% on textbook rentals and 90% on used textbooks.

Get FREE 7-day instant eTextbook access. Uncommonly good collectible and rare books from uncommonly good booksellers. Find Disowning Slavery by Melish, Joanne Pope at Biblio. Uncommonly good collectible and rare books from uncommonly good booksellers.

COVID Update. Ap Biblio is open and shipping orders. Disowning Slavery Following the abolition of slavery in New England, white citizens seemed to forget that it had ever existed there. Drawing on a wide array of primary sources—from slaveowners' diaries to children's daybooks to racist broadsides—Joanne Pope Melish reveals not.

Publisher's description: Following the abolition of slavery in New England, white citizens seemed to forget that it had ever existed there. Drawing on a wide array of primary sources--from slaveowners' diaries to children's daybooks to racist broadsides--Joanne Pope Melish reveals not only how northern society changed but how its perceptions changed as well.

Buy Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and "Race" in New England, by Joanne Pope Melish (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

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Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. One of these historians is Joanne Pope Melish and her recent book, Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and Race in New England, exposes what has been called "a virtual amnesia about slavery in New England." New England newspapers, operating from a "Chamber of Commerce" mindset, rarely mention the region's history of slave labor.

Joanne Pope Melish, in her book, “Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and ‘Race’ in New England, ,” analyzes the many dimensions of this process. Anyone who has studied the antebellum period knows that slavery violated Quaker principles and that some Quakers participated in the Underground Railroad.

One of the most notable Quakers in the Underground Railroad was Levi Coffin, who was born in Guilford County, North Carolina, but as a young man moved to Indiana and later to Cincinnati.

Joanne Pope Melish, in her book, “Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and ‘Race’ in New England, ,” analyzes the many dimensions of this process. Whites throughout New England took steps to exclude or segregate free people of color.

They were generally excluded from juries. In houses of worship, they were restricted to the.